Tag Archives: rainier

Mount Rainier via the Disappointment Cleaver

Mount Rainier via Disappointment Cleaver route

14,410′

9000’+ gain

This post represents two milestones: I recently had the opportunity to summit Mt. Rainier for the first time, and this is my 100th post on the Blog! I couldn’t have picked a more fitting trip.

We ascended via the easiest route on the mountain (the DC route) but Rainier is not an easy mountain and it was a significant challenge I’ll remember for a long time.

My team of 4 independent climbers geared up at the Wilderness Information Center at Paradise on Friday morning at 6am in order to get in line for a permit on the Ingraham Glacier – which we scored the last of!

We set off from Paradise at 7:30am or so, gaining over 2500′ on dry ground until we hit the Muir Snowfield for the last few thousand feet to our first rest stop, at Camp Muir (elevation 10,200′). We grabbed some food, rested for a bit, then roped up for travel across the mellow traverse on the Cowlitz Glacier.

After reaching the dry rocks on the other side (Cathedral Gap) we shortened the rope with Kiwi coils and continued up the loose but manageable switchbacks. Soon we stepped onto the heavily crevassed Ingraham Glacier for the final couple hundred feet to camp.

Continue reading Mount Rainier via the Disappointment Cleaver

Winter Awaits – Paradise Tour

After watching the Snotel telemetry like a hawk for a few days, I bet that the recent torrential downpour in the Cascades wouldn’t beat up the early season snowpack too badly above Paradise. With a few inches of snow forecast following a nice cold front, we headed down to Rainier for our first turns of the year.

As we passed through Puyallup, we saw a thin layer of snow on the trees and fields and our spirits rose. I don’t remember seeing that at all even in the depth of winter last year! The hills around Ashford were beautiful in white and green.

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Conditions at Paradise were windy with an inch or two of fresh snow drifting considerably. We skinned up to the slope below Pan Face but the wind picked up and scoured the slopes clean to the icy rain crust, so we turned around. The best snow was in the trees just above the parking lot. Coverage was OK – large rocks and creeks were still quite open. Edith Creek valley needs more snow.

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Edith Creek from below Alta Vista
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Powder in the trees below Alta Vista. Yummy.

The mountain even came out for a little while and we got a bit of sun.

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Mountaineers Glacier Skiing/Crevasse Rescue Course

I signed up for the Mountaineers ski crevasse rescue class which ended up being a really worthwhile way to spend a few weekday evenings and a weekend field trip. We learned about basic glacier travel, route finding, and especially crevasse rescue pulley systems. The purpose of learning the system is to be able to haul a potentially injured skier out of a crevasse on a rope using mechanical force advantage.

For our field trip we spent a rainy Saturday refreshing self arrest skills and practicing roped travel in Paradise environs at Mt. Rainier. On Sunday we spent a beautiful sunny day hauling each other out of a real-life crevasse on the Nisqually! Here are a few shots:

Our practice site on the Nisqually Glacier
Skinning above the cloud layer on Rainier!

Continue reading Mountaineers Glacier Skiing/Crevasse Rescue Course

Ski Mountaineering/AIARE Level 1 Class

In November I started a course with the Foothills Mountaineers, called Ski and Snowboard Mountaineering with an AIARE Level 1 avalanche certification module included. There are lots of informative classroom sessions, but the heart of the course is a series of field trips.

Paradise Shakedown Tour

The first field trip was a quick jaunt up into the Alta Vista section of Mount Rainier National Park, not far from the Paradise visitor’s center. It was great to get a chance to test out all the equipment with some knowledgeable instructors there to assist, and we even got some views.

 

 

 

Snow conditions were largely stable, with a well-consolidated snowpack, although we did see some avalanche crowns from a cycle earlier in the week.

 

We were supposed to build snow shelters but the low snow conditions made that fairly challenging. I learned that the dense snow sets up as hard as concrete so we tried to cut slabs of it with some success. My sad attempt at a shelter might have kept me marginally warmer than being out in the open but I’m looking forward to trying again during the overnight field trip in March.

The ski down was not much fun – foot-wide runnels where water had run off the snow during a rain storm earlier that week made it difficult to make turns. There were also lots of exposed creek beds and rocks.

AIARE Level 1 Class

The American Institute for Avalanche Research and Education (AIARE)  sanctions local avalanche training courses at multiple levels of depth. The Level 1 class is designed for backcountry enthusiasts new to the backcountry, and it taught a very important set of skills that will serve me in multiple activities through the snowier months.

There were four classroom sessions covering avalanche risk factors, how to read avalanche forecasts, human factors, safe travel techniques, and other pieces of knowledge. The heart of the course was a weekend with two field trips in the Snoqualmie “backcountry” where we got to put our book skills to use.

Day 1 consisted largely of avalanche beacon practice. We tested the function of our transceivers, got a sense for the working range, and ran two “realistic” victim rescue scenarios as a team. Those were definitely the most useful portion of the course. It rained pretty much all day, and the low snow conditions made things challenging (navigation around exposed bushes and rocks).

 

Day 2 was a group tour in and out of bounds near Summit Central – we practiced making decisions as a team and discussed potential avalanche problems. Even though it was a low-risk day according to the NWAC forecast,  temps reached over 50F so we were able to observe the precursors to wet loose avalanches (as if there was enough loose snow to even have a problem!)

 

This picture pretty much sums up the conditions:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paradise summer ski

This month, I moved to Seattle to begin working full time. I got the shipment with all my outdoor gear just this week so I was really excited to get out for my first hike.

Forest fires shut down Highway 2, and I-90 was closed to just one lane. Forget it; let’s just go to Rainier instead. And while we’re at it… why not break out the skis?

Unfortunately the visibility was especially poor, and nobody else in my group felt like hiking up the Muir snowfield into a cloud just so I could ski. I found a nice little run of summer snow right below panorama point that I lapped a couple of times. Even though the summit was completely blocked, we had some views of the Tattoosh range once we got below the cloud ceiling, and the wildflowers lower down made the hike worth our while.