Category Archives: Mountaineering

Mount Rainier via the Disappointment Cleaver

Mount Rainier via Disappointment Cleaver route

14,410′

9000’+ gain

This post represents two milestones: I recently had the opportunity to summit Mt. Rainier for the first time, and this is my 100th post on the Blog! I couldn’t have picked a more fitting trip.

We ascended via the easiest route on the mountain (the DC route) but Rainier is not an easy mountain and it was a significant challenge I’ll remember for a long time.

My team of 4 independent climbers geared up at the Wilderness Information Center at Paradise on Friday morning at 6am in order to get in line for a permit on the Ingraham Glacier – which we scored the last of!

We set off from Paradise at 7:30am or so, gaining over 2500′ on dry ground until we hit the Muir Snowfield for the last few thousand feet to our first rest stop, at Camp Muir (elevation 10,200′). We grabbed some food, rested for a bit, then roped up for travel across the mellow traverse on the Cowlitz Glacier.

After reaching the dry rocks on the other side (Cathedral Gap) we shortened the rope with Kiwi coils and continued up the loose but manageable switchbacks. Soon we stepped onto the heavily crevassed Ingraham Glacier for the final couple hundred feet to camp.

Continue reading Mount Rainier via the Disappointment Cleaver

Mt. Baker Ski Ascent via Squak Glacier

Mt. Baker via Squak Glacer

10,781’

7000′ gain

5200’ skiable vert

Mt. Baker has been staring me in the face for months, ever since I started hiking Central Cascades peaks again. Rising almost straight out of the ocean from some viewpoints, Baker towers over the North Cascades with one of the most extensive glacier systems in the lower 48 states. While nearly 4,000’ lower than its neighbor Mt. Rainier, prodigious snowfall more than makes up for the difference when it comes to ice and snow.

Baker’s south side

This trip was lead by Radka and Chris, a couple of instructors with the Mountaineers glacier ski and snowboard travel course. This was the second year that they had agreed to lead a trip for recent graduates of the course like myself, and I had to take advantage of the opportunity. (See C&R’s turns-all-year trip report)

Mt. Baker made me a little nervous as a ski objective. There were a lot of “news” associated with this trip: first time summiting a glaciated peak, first time skiing on a glacier unroped, first time wearing crampons with my ski boots, first time climbing on steep snow as a rope team. Most of all, I was concerned about my admittedly not awesome skiing ability when considering the “Roman Wall” on the upper mountain. I had skied to 30 degrees steepness on Mt. Adams with no trouble, but under icy or hard snow conditions, the 35 to 40 degree Roman Wall would be some of the tougher skiing I’d ever done outside the resort, and with pretty terrible consequences in the event of a fall. This kept me thinking twice about whether I should join the trip, but ultimately I resolved to go along, knowing that I could hang out at the summit crater and wait for the rest of the group to summit and come back down if I didn’t like the looks of the conditions.

Continue reading Mt. Baker Ski Ascent via Squak Glacier

Mountaineers Glacier Skiing/Crevasse Rescue Course

I signed up for the Mountaineers ski crevasse rescue class which ended up being a really worthwhile way to spend a few weekday evenings and a weekend field trip. We learned about basic glacier travel, route finding, and especially crevasse rescue pulley systems. The purpose of learning the system is to be able to haul a potentially injured skier out of a crevasse on a rope using mechanical force advantage.

For our field trip we spent a rainy Saturday refreshing self arrest skills and practicing roped travel in Paradise environs at Mt. Rainier. On Sunday we spent a beautiful sunny day hauling each other out of a real-life crevasse on the Nisqually! Here are a few shots:

Our practice site on the Nisqually Glacier
Skinning above the cloud layer on Rainier!

Continue reading Mountaineers Glacier Skiing/Crevasse Rescue Course

Mt. Adams Ski Mountaineering

[Cross-posted in part from Turns-All-Year]

Mt. Adams South Rib

12,280′

6700′ gain (6000′ skiable)

Becca (a classmate from the Mountaineers ski/snowboard mountaineering class) and I headed up Mt. Adams from the parking lot at Cold Springs to take advantage of the beautiful weather window and no permit fees yet. This would be my second climb of Adam’s – after a trip on foot in 2012, I was really savoring the idea of a ski descent.

We arrived from Seattle after a 5 hour drive through Portland  at about 9:30pm and crashed for a very short time.

Frozen glaze at sunrise

We headed out at around 3am thinking the snow would get soft and sloppy early in the morning given the warm night. The first ~mile and few hundred feeet were on dirt but we hit continuous snow at 6000′, transitioned to skis, and found that the snow froze harder under the clear skies than we were expecting; a breakable glaze covered everything and made skinning a bit challenging, especially on the steeper sections. As we skinned up Suksdorf Ridge we got pulled a little bit too high below South Butte in the dark and had to backtrack a bit to regain the line.

The beautiful South Face

Continue reading Mt. Adams Ski Mountaineering

Kaleetan Peak

Kaleetan Peak

~4500′ gain

~12 miles

With a beautiful sunny weekend ahead, Ryan and I set out to do some spring snow climbing and chose a prominent summit in the Snoqualmie Pass area, Kaleetan Peak (meaning “Arrow” in the Chinook language). With the shockingly low snowpack this year, we weren’t exactly sure what sort of conditions we would encounter.

We opted for a lazy alpine start of 6am leaving from the Denny Creek trailhead in order to minimize the already-small risk of wet loose avalanches on the descent (in warm afternoon conditions, “solar” aspects can often become destabilized).

Our plan was to ascend the peak via an East facing couloir to access the normal scrambling route from there to the summit. We packed for non-technical snow climbing including ice axe and crampons, both of which turned out to be essential on this route in these conditions.

The Denny Creek trail to the pass is very pleasant – dense forest, waterfalls, and nice views down the valley as the trail gradually gains elevation to Hemlock Pass..

Keekwulee Falls (Credit Ryan H)

Intermittent ice and snow can be found just below Hemlock Pass but it should be gone fairly soon. Arriving at Melakwa Lake early in the morning, the air was cool enough to break out the gloves as we admired the thin glaze of ice on the water from the freeze the night before – a good sign that snow conditions would be nice and consolidated on the path ahead. Continue reading Kaleetan Peak